The Quilietti Family

Your Quilietti family heritage

STANTON, The Grady connections

Connected to us through the Stanton/Quilietti line are these very Irish surnames.

Margaret Grady is the 3rd Great Grandmother of Jamie Stanton.http://trees.ancestry.co.uk/tree/18269627/family?fpid=635637500

We will start with the Grady surname.   Edward Stanton married Margaret Grady in Ireland in 1844.   Margaret’s father was Patrick  Grady and her mother was Anne Maguire.   Grady or O’Grady is one of the more well name Irish surnames.

It is very difficult to find R.C. Church records in  County Mayo because they really did not start to happen until about 1830, that was  basically because Catholic Emancipation didn’t happen in Ireland until 1829 and most RC parish records in County Mayo don’t start until the 1830s at the earliest and many not until the 1870s or later.

So if we can dig any deeper than that we must rely on other things like gravestone inscriptions, family bibles or word of mouth carried on through the generations.

During the height of the famine 1845-1850 100,000 people left County Mayo alone.  There were no records kept at this side of the water, the folks were crammed onto the ships and sent away.  It was only those  emigrants who hit the American shores whose  records were handed to the Ports of Arrival.  The ones who died on the journey were forgotten.

Civil registration didn’t exist in Ireland until as late as 1864 so therefore anyone who died during the great famine, and there was over one million in Ireland, were no accounted for.  As far as the births went,the ones who were recorded did not have parents names attached, or places or dates or birth, or anything really, just a name,  so they were just names in limbo with no connections to anyone else.  Any surviving Roman Catholic records  which do survive today do not include any  burial records of information about the deceased.

Grady:

Derived from ‘grada’ meaning ‘illustrious’, this was the name of an aristocratic family centred on cos Limerick and Clare. In the mid-19th century, there were 1103 Grady households; they were most numerous in Cos Mayo (136), Galway (133), Limerick (113), Tipperary (112) and Clare (104). The O prefix has been reattached by most, especially in co Clare. A 17th century branch of the family changed the name to Brady.

This is a genealogists nightmare of course.http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bbunce77/Irish_Surnames.html

(O)Grady

(click image for a full size view, then click “File/Save As” to save it to you hard drive)

Cormac Cas was King of Thomond around the fifth century and he spawned a tribal grouping known as the Dál gCais or Dalcassians which dominated Munster until the final suppression of the old Gaelic order in the seventeenth century. Twenty-three generations later and in direct descent from Cas we find Gradhach (also called Bradach), meaning “illustrious”, from whom the name O’Grádhaigh (descendant of Gradach) is derived. This Irish name would later be anglicised as O’Grady.

The O’Grady sept originated in Co. Clare though the seat and territory of the Chief of the Name has for several centuries been at Killballyowen, Co. Limerick. The present holder of that dignity (i.e. in popular parlance “The O’Grady”) is one of the very few the authenticity of whose claim to chieftainship is officially recognized by the Chief Herald and the Genealogical Office in Ireland. The name in Irish is O Grádaigh or more shortly O Gráda, so that the anglicized form approximates closely to the original. Keating’s History gives O’Grada or O’Grady, as chief of Kinel Donghuile, a large territory comprising the present barony of Lower Tullagh in Clare. The O’Gradys are thus designated by O’Heerin, and several chiefs of the name are mentioned in our annals: “O’Grada took the entire lands of the profitable Kinel Dongali, His swords yellow hafted are keen, Strong are the blows of his forces in battle”.

The O Gradys are an ancient aristocratic family, kinsmen of their neighbours the O Briens of Thomond in Limerick. The original O Grady stronghold was Inis Cealtra (Holy Island) on Lough Derg. The tower of a ruined O Grady castle can still be seen in their former territory in Cineal-Donghaile near Tuamgraney, County Clare, where the O Briens granted them a generous acreage of land. A little further north, near Scarriff, there is a Lough O Grady.

The O Gradys were prominent churchmen and filled high ecclesiastical office, including the bishopries of Cashel, Tuam and Killaloe. Towards the close of the thirteenth century they were at war with their “cousins” and former allies, the O Briens, who drove them from Clare to Limerick. Hugh O Grady acquired the lands of Kilballyowen when, in 1309, he married the daughter of the chief of the O Kerwick or Kirby clan. Killballyowen, near Bruff, County Limerick, has been in the O Grady family ever since. It is close to Lough Gur, a small lake around which there is a rich concentration of ancient monuments, including stone circles, forts, dolmens and other megalithic remains. The O Gradys multiplied and formed new septs at Cappercullen, Elton Grange, Lodge, Cahir and Mount Prospect, and many other Munster holdings.

An O Grady who emigrated from Clare a century ago married a black American woman. They kept the Irish name proudly in their family and his great-grandson is Cassius O Grady Clay, or Muhammad Ali.  If we examine the distribution of the name in modern times we find that, combining the separate returns for O’Grady and Grady (which are of course the same name), the total is not inconsiderable amounting to some four thousand all told. The majority of these hail from Co. Clare as might be expected. This is followed by Mayo which is of interest because it has been stated, on what authority I cannot say, that there was a distinct O’Grady sept originating in Mayo – more probably it was an offshoot of the Dalcassian stock. Many of the Gradys of Mayo and Roscommon are Greadys – Mag Riada in Irish, corrupted in the spoken language to O Griada. In Co. Tipperary Grady is often Gready in disguise, the Irish form there being O Greada. This, no doubt, is the original of the names Gredy and Graddy which were regarded as numerous in the barony of Middlethird (Co. Tipperary) in 1659. There is a constant tendency for uncommon names to be assimilated to better known ones of a similar sound: thus Gready tends to become Grady, as does Graddy in Kerry.http://www.araltas.com/features/grady/


Surname: O’Grady
Branch: O’Grady
Origins: Irish
More Info: Ireland
Background:O’Grady, Ó Grádaigh (gráda, illustrious). A Dalcassian sept. The leading family went to County Limerick but the majority are still in Clare where the prefix O is retained more than elsewhere. An important branch changed their name to Brady in the late sixteenth century. The well-known name Grady has to a large extent absorbed the rarer Gready which is properly a Mayo name. This resulted in the name Grady being numerous in north Connacht and adjacent areas of Ulster.The name O’Grady originated from one of the most illustrious of the Dalcassian clans and one which has remained closely associated with County Clare. The surname is derived from the Irish form Ó Grádaigh or Ó Gráda (noble) and is said to come from their traditional ancestor, Grádach.The present head of the clan, The O’Grady, or “chief of the name” as he is so styled, holds one of the few authentic native titles recognised by the State. The O’Grady family tree contains many other distinguished figures prominent in public and social life as well as members who became involved in cultural activities in times past.The original territory of the O’Grady comprised much of the Barony of Lower Tulla, but an ancestor Hugh O’Grady left Clare in the beginning of the 14thcentury to settle at Killballyowen near Bruff in Co. Limerick where he acquired by marriage a good deal of land and property. His son William married a daughter of the Knight of Glin while the family continued to enjoy a high social standing, references to which may be found in Burke’s “Landed Gentry of Ireland”.The most distinguished bearer of the name must be the scholarly Standish Hayes O’Grady who in his student days was a friend of both O’Donovan and O’Curry and undertook the task of cataloguing Irish Manuscripts in the British Museum.

His most important work, and of interest to local historians, is his translation of the “Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh” as recorded by Sean MacCraith, the only contemporary account of the principal events which occurred in North Munster from the 12th to the 14th century.

His cousin, Standish James O’Grady also gained a place in literature as novelist and historian. He wrote a history of Ireland emphasising the importance of our heroic period and widely known mythological figures. Several historical novels also came from his pen which include “In the Wake of King James”, “The Flight of the Eagle” and “Red Hugh’s Captivity” all of which aroused a new interest among his contemporaries in Irish epic literature.

The name is still to be found throughout East Clare while it is to Iniscealtra (Holy Island) in Lough Derg one must go to view an impressive memorial to their forebears complete with a carving of the family arms and motto “Vulneratus non Victur” – “Wounded not Conquered”. It is erected in the interior of St. Caimin’s Church whose splendid Romanesque Doorway is now fully restored; this tablet bears the following inscription “J. A. Grady reported those churches and monuments to the Grace and Glory of God 1703.”

And another account:

The O’Grady sept originated in County Clare and may be classed as Dalcassian, though the seat and territory of the Chief of the name has for several centuries been at Killballyowen, County Limerick. The present holder of that dignity (i.e. in popular parlance “The O’Grady” is one of the very few the authenticity of whose claim to chieftainship is officially recognized in Ireland. The name in Irish is O’Grádaigh or more shortly O Gráda, so that the anglicized form approximates closely to the original. A peculiarity about it is that its leading family in County Clare, who favoured the English invaders in the time of Henry VIII, gradually changed their name from O’Grady to Brady, being described in legal documents of the sixteenth century as “O’Grady alias Brady” or vice versa. Thus the Bradys around Tuamgraney in East Clare are really O’Gradys, though Brady itself a common name in Ireland (especially in north Leinster and south Ulster) having no affinity with O’Grady at all. The ancestor of the present chief, though known at the time of his migration to County Limerick as John O’Grady alias Brady, dropped the latter and his descendants have ever since used teh ancient and correct form of their name. If we examine the distribution of the name in modern times we find that, combining the separate returns for O’Grady and Grady (which are of course the same name), the total is not inconsiderable amounting to some four thousand all told. The majority of these hail from County Clare as might be expected. This is followed by Mayo which is of interest because it has been stated, on what authority I cannot say, that there was a distinct O’Grady sept originating in Mayo – more probably it was an offshoot of the Dalcassian stock.

Many of the Gradys of Mayo and Roscommon are Greadys – Mag Riada in Irish, corrupted in the spoken language to O Griada. In County Tipperary Grady is often Gready in disguise, the Irish form there being O Greada. This, no doubt, is the original of the name Gredy and Graddy wich were regarded as numerous in the barony of Middlethird (County Tipperary) in 1659. There is a constant tendency for uncommon names to be assimilated to better known ones of a similar sound: thus Gready tends to become Grady, as does Graddy in Kerry.

John O’Grady was Archbishop of Tuam from 1364 to 1372. In modern times several members of the County Limerick O’Gradys have distinguished themselves in the service of Britain, one Standish O’Grady (1768-1840) being created Viscount Guillamore. The forename Standish with O’Grady is perpetuated by Standish Hayes O’Grady (1832-1915), who has been called “the last of the grand old scholars of Ireland”.

Name Variations: Grady, O’Grady, Brady, O’Brady, Braidy, Graidy, Bradie, Braidie, Braydy, Braydie, Gradie, Graidie, Graydy, Graydie, Gradaigh, Grada, Gradwell, Bradigan, O’Bradigan, O’Gradaigh, O’Gradys, Greadys, O’Greada, Gredy, Graddy.

References:

4 Responses to “STANTON, The Grady connections”

  1. o'grady says:

    bonjours je recherche mes origines mon grand père se prénome owen o’ grady ? et serais né en 1889. Dans l’attente de votre réponse

  2. Boyle says:

    Looking for the wife of Rev. Standish O’Grady (1780-1829). Mary Jane ?

  3. Peter Grady says:

    FYI – I have traced my Grady line back to the 1780’s and for sure the 1790’s in Nova Scotia. I think my NS ancestor was a UEL “refugee” from the American Revolution but not 100% sure yet. He apparently was born in Ireland around 1740 +/- so he must have moved to the New England area or perhaps the South (Virginia or Carolina), some time around 1760 ff.

    His name was James Grady. He was probably demobbed with NS Volunteers or maybe Prince of Wales Regiment in about 1783 in Antigonish NS.

    Not sure how to ID his time in Ireland ? Any suggestions ?

  4. Helen says:

    Thanks for your very interesting comment. It is wonderful to hear of this history

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